Food Truck Feature: Boo Coo Roux | Chicago, IL

Boo Coo Roux Food Truck Wrap Design and Branding, Chicago Illinois

We had the opportunity to sit down with Marissa and Matt of Boo Coo Roux, a Cajun & Creole food truck based in Chicago, and learn about their journey. 

How did you decide to go forward with launching your own food truck?

We thought about it for a while and imagined some different scenarios, some in where we would possibly leave Chicago. There was about two years of various research, trips to other cities, getting to know the scene around Chicago, and experimenting with recipes before we decided it was time to go for it. We realized the the food truck scene was growing in Chicago and wanted to jump in before it became oversaturated.

What inspired the branding, logo design, and identity look & feel for your food truck?

We wanted something fun and kind of crazy without going too overboard or looking like a scene from Bourbon Street. In our heads we imagined a clean and sophisticated look that had an edge to it. We initially wanted the design to be colorful without looking tacky. We never imagined black as being our background color or main color, but when we were presented with it we loved it. Nicole transformed our ideas exactly how we imagined it. 

How did you pick the name for your truck?

We originally thought of the name Roux, simple yet an important ingredient in one of our main dishes, gumbo. That name was taken, not by another truck but by another Illinois business so we started playing around with how we could still use the word roux in our name. We researched words and found the slang word "boo coo" which comes from the French word "beaucoup" meaning "a lot" and it all came together from there.

What kind of truck does your food sell in 10 words or less?

Homemade fresh and spicy quality Cajun comfort food with a twist.      

Any quick, insightful or funny story as to how you decided to really go forward with launching your own food truck?

We originally considered moving to Colorado in order to open a Chicago-style food truck with dishes like homemade Italian beef and homemade hot dogs and bratwursts. After some research on the industry in Colorado we decided to stay in Chicago and try it here first. We needed to drop the Chicago-style food since there are already so many options (but we still have an amazing Italian beef recipe on the back burner just in case!). From there we thought about the type of food that was lacking in restaurants and especially the food truck scene and we landed on Cajun. Matt and Louis have strong backgrounds in French cooking as well so it really made sense since so many of Cajun dishes incorporate French cooking techniques. 

How do you use your food truck's website for new business and what features do you think are the most important online?

We use the website to advertise our menu as well as catering options. I think the most important feature is keeping an updated menu. Most people want to know what is available if they are going to make the trip to the truck. We don't use the website yet to post our schedule but hope to in the future. Without going into detail, the food truck parking scene is no joke and there are days where it can be hard to know where one will park. We post our locations for lunch both on Facebook and Twitter.

What's been the hardest thing to date in the whole process of launching your food truck?

Everything. It's an emotional experience when you own your own business, you become invested in every aspect. However, if I have to pick one area that was the most difficult it was probably the initial startup and build of the truck. It seemed like it would never end despite being organized and doing everything in our power to move things along.

What's been the most surprising (success or tip)?

We are not from Louisiana so we were very cautious to pursue this style of cuisine and wanted respect the food while making it our own. This involved a lot of R&D and some trips to New Orleans. That being said, it's an overwhelming success when someone from the region compliments our food. We always create food that we hope pleases the masses but a compliment from a native is always the icing on the cake.

What is/are some of the most helpful resources you found in researching how to launch a food truck?

Matt knows the owner of the Fat Shallot from his days at Everest and he was lucky enough to work on the truck. He got to see first-hand what operation on a truck was like. His experience gave him a good foundation of where to begin the process and what to think about. They were and still are a helpful resource.  There are so many details to think about with startup like insurance, propane, vendors, food cost, website, design, etc.

Words of wisdom do you want to leave us and any fellow aspiring food truckers across the country with?

It's tough. Any cook or chef in the food industry already understands the demands of that world, and a truck is no exception, especially when you approach it with the intention to create everything from scratch like we do. 

What's your personal favorite thing on the menu?

The gumbo! We went through many batches and minor changes to come up with a recipe that we feel best represents the dish.

Favorite part about working with Design Womb on the food truck branding?

Nicole! Throughout the entire startup process she was one of the best people that we worked with. She never missed a beat. We are still obsessed with the final design and could not be happier. I don’t even think we had to make any changes on the design option that we picked because it was so spot on, in fact we had a hard time picking from the options that she gave us because they all were so great!

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June 21, 2016  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Spotted: Curry Up Now at the Apple WWDC.

Curry Up Now's food truck was used as part of an example during a demo at Apple's spring WWDC. The logo design and branding work we did for the food truck and resturants made a flash appearance on the big screen next to the truck's delicious Indian street food menu. As huge fans of these conferences and gadget annoucement days, we're astonished!

June 16, 2016  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Why the Sound of a Brand Name Matters

Sound of a Brand Name Fast Co Design

Annie Sneed of Fast Company talks sounds and branding. 

“Brand names reveal a lot more than you think, as the fascinating science of ‘sound symbolism’ suggests.”

Which ice cream has fewer calories: Frish or Frosh? Which city is geographically closer: Fleen or Floon? The majority of people would think that Frish would have fewer calories than Frosh, and that Floon was farther away than Fleen. Did you think the same? These words are fictional, but the sounds that they make cause our minds to apply certain meanings to them.

Language studies have shown that humans make cognitive connections with sounds and meanings. There are a lot of components that make up brand voice, but is your name aligned with what you do? Or more importantly, with what people may think you do? Different sounds in words create different connections than you may intend your brand to say. Read on (especially if you’re in the market for a new name!) to see what your sounds may actually mean to clients at first glance. Definitely something to consider when you’re branding, rebranding or naming your next company.

June 04, 2016  |  BY Design Womb

Insights from a Writer and Director: Can Brands Talk? (Sort of)

Insights from a Writer and Director: Can Brands Talk?

What is Brand Voice?

Brand Voice might sound like the robot language of a dystopian future, or the natural result of Citizens United, but thankfully it’s neither of those. Quite simply, Brand Voice is the distillation of everything your brand stands for. It’s a codified set of beliefs that inform every communication your brand puts out, from TV commercials to Tweets, to customer service calls. Defining your brand’s voice means making sure everything your brand says is true to itself.

How do I find my Brand’s Voice?

Brand Voice should be a direct reflection of the brand, it’s employees, customers, and products. When working with a brand team to define their brand voice, I always start with “Why did you start this company?” Most businesses are started by passionate people with an idea, and there’s nothing more powerful than sharing that passion with customers. Then we talk about the brand’s ethos, what does it stand for? Is it about empowering employees, or saving the world, or perhaps letting customers ice their own toaster strudel instead of relying upon pre-iced pastries that only lead to heartbreak and disappointment. We get to the bottom of why the business exists, and how it makes its customers feel. We get to the truth behind the brand, and that becomes the foundation for the brand’s voice.

Making sure Brand Voice isn’t monotone.

I tell clients more than I probably should, when you hire a writer to help define your brand’s voice, you’re hiring them to ensure you don’t need a writer every time you need writing. Defining and understanding your brand’s voice gives you a clear roadmap on how to communicate. It ensures that every message is “on brand” no matter what the medium or subject matter, and perhaps most importantly, it gives your brand a point of view that differentiates it from every other one out there. Brand voice is about articulating what a brand stands for and saying it in a way that’s ownable, distinct, and different, and making sure that every time your brand opens its purely metaphorical mouth, what comes out represents exactly what you intended.

May 03, 2016  |  BY Design Womb

Dipnotics Dips Packaging Design

Graphic Design USA featured our custom wrap-around packaging design for Dipnotics Dips. These dips don't taste healthy, they taste delicious. Check out the full project on our site. 

April 28, 2016  |  BY Design Womb

Branding & Packaging Design