Viewing "food-beverage" Entries

Food Truck Website Templates – Winter Sale

Made For Food Trucks – Website Templates – Your Website, Made Easy

If it's your off-season, it's the perfect time to check off some of those lingering to-do lists, starting with your website. Our Winter Sale on the Made For Food Trucks website templates starts today and can save you some dough while you're off the road. Sign up now.

January 17, 2017  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Food Truck Feature: El Pollo Submarine | Kensington, MD

We had the opportunity to sit down with Paul and Janee, owner's of the Kensington, Maryland streets' newest food truck, El Pollo Submarine. We discussed their food truck design, the unexpected bumps along the way, and what tips they have for food truck success.

How did you decide on a name for your food truck business?

Our main item is a savory chicken sub, or submarine. Chicken in Spanish translates to “Pollo”. As fans of the Beatles, “El Pollo Submarine” ala “The Yellow Submarine” instantly came to mind.

What inspired the branding, logo design, and identity for your food truck?

We drew our initial inspiration from the colorful and vibrant native artwork of El Salvador. Since the name of our truck is a play on “The Yellow Submarine,” we also wanted to incorporate the 60’s style artwork of the album. We then set Nicole upon the difficult task of tastefully mixing these two concepts together, which she pulled off flawlessly!

What kind of food does your truck sell in 10 words or less?

Salvadoran comfort food. Mainly: Pupusas, Chicken Sub, Enchiladas (Salvadoran Tostadas).

How did you decide to go forward with launching your own food truck?

Janee had always daydreamed about owning a food truck, but never considered it a realistic possibility. Paul had always wanted to be an entrepreneur, but couldn’t come up with the right idea for his first business. After dating for a couple years, we decided that together we could make our dreams a reality.

How do you use your food truck's website for new business and what features do you think are the most important online?

The most important feature to a food truck website is a calendar that displays a weekly location schedule. Next to that, contact information is essential to book catering gigs. And while we almost forgot to mention the menu, we realize that as a food truck you’ll rely on being seen or spotted. The menu will be on the truck, but you have to attract people to your truck first before they are compelled to look you up online. Having the menu on the website is only useful once people are interested or hungry enough to know who you are, and where you’ll be next.

What's been the hardest thing to date in the whole process of launching your food truck?

Aside from taking the leap and leaving the prospect of a “stable career,” the hardest thing we’ve had to deal with to date was getting our truck in good running condition. While you should trust your vendor to deliver a fully functioning truck, you should never doubt that mistakes can be made, and accidents can happen. Ours broke down after 10 minutes of driving it for the first time, and we were stuck trying to get a tow truck during rush hour traffic. Not all tow trucks can tow other trucks, and while it seems obvious to us now, we learned it the hard way. We called several tow companies, all of which denied our request. It took us three hours of waiting under the summer sun on the shoulder to finally find a company capable of helping us.

What's been the most surprising business tip you can share (success or tip)?

Cooking delicious food is just a small fraction of what you’ll do as a food truck owner. Starting and running a food truck business is a larger project than we anticipated, and you must be prepared to manage numerous tasks. Communication is key! Without effective communication you run the risk of a project steering off course. Unless you’re the type who likes to learn the hard way, our business tip to help you succeed would be to consider taking a few courses in project management before undertaking a food truck business.

What is/are some of the most helpful resources you found in researching how to launch a food truck?

Books we have found helpful are “Running a Food Truck for Dummies” and “The Food Truck Handbook”. And helpful websites include Foodtruckr.com and Mobile-Cuisine.com.

Words of wisdom you want to leave with us and fellow aspiring food truckers across the country?

Remember this: there is no food truck without a truck. The truck itself is the business’ biggest asset. Without a properly running truck, you have NO means of conducting business. Our truck was in bad shape when we first received it. Sometimes things go wrong, so our words of wisdom are: “expect the best, but plan for the worst.” If you plan for the worst, you’ll be one step ahead when things inevitably don’t go as planned. The saying “time is money” cannot be more true in the food truck business. Time not spent networking, catering or vending are missed opportunities and money not being made. How well you anticipate and bounce back from major and even minor setbacks will determine your success in this business.

What's your favorite thing on the menu?

Our favorite item is found in the name of our truck, the chicken “pollo” sub! Although any one of our dishes can be a favorite depending on what mood we’re in.

Favorite part about working with Design Womb on the food truck branding?

The best part of working with Design Womb was seeing our concept come to life. There’s something quite special about trusting someone to personify your food truck in such a way that it evokes an identity beyond your own. We no longer view our food truck as merely a vehicle that can cook and sell food. A food truck with a brand is more than that. Thanks to Design Womb, our food truck is a key team player who markets and advertises for us in a visual way. Not only is it a mobile kitchen, it’s a mobile billboard…our mascot.

August 16, 2016  |  BY Design Womb

Craft Cider Packaging Design: Present and Future

Whose gluten free and rapidly stealing the spotlight? Cider, that’s who. These brands are the up and coming players in spirits, and they’re no exception when it comes to craft cider packaging design. Mint, jalapeno, basil, elderberry, cherry; these are just some of the flavors incorporated in new craft ciders that provide plenty of space for play both in packaging design and on your taste buds.

Current Craft Cider Packaging Design Trends

Cider packaging design has historically focused on apples, orchards, trees, or some combination thereof, which is a huge contributor to the perception of all ciders being extremely sweet. Although some brands still pay homage to the drink’s main ingredient and its roots, the incorporation of new, eccentric ingredients and flavors have opened up a new world of creative packaging design. For example, Seattle Cider CompanyNew Belgium, and Shacksbury all have their own takes on dry, semi-dry, and semi-sweet ciders. This evolution has allowed cider to become a drink to be enjoyed all year round, not just in the summer months, which opens up even more possibilities for the composition of the drink as well as its design. Demographic trends are impacting this industry too. Hard. Although ciders have always been incredibly popular amongst younger women, the results are in, and guys like cider too. Who knew? This has led to a large gravitation towards an outdoorsy, craftsman-like, vintage, and more gender neutral design aesthetic in the cider realm to appeal to all consumers. Perhaps this is cider’s way of sneaking in on beer packaging design territory… Whatever it is, it’s working.

The Future of Craft Cider Brands

As more consumers opt for a healthier, gluten free, and in some cases, organic drink option on Friday night, craft ciders are only going to grow from here. Not only is cider a top choice for the health-conscious and/or calorie-counting population (is cider really that much better? haha), but the spirit is quickly becoming on par with beer and wine as a drink menu staple for all occasions. Craft cider will only become more synonymous with beer as small batches, unique bottles and cans, and targeted packaging design continue to become the norm. The majority of craft cider drinkers are coming from the craft beer world (Perhaps they are also trying to reel in some wine drinkers? Some of the really dry ones are almost champagne-like, have you had?). Bottom line, the same level of quality from the overall brand is expected. They want to know where the ingredients that are in that bottle or can came from, what makes these ingredients special, and they want to know the story behind who made it and why. These are important elements to include in the essence of each craft cider’s packaging design to continue to capture that market and eventually position cider as a premium drink. (People shop with their eyes first, after all.) With a larger emphasis on quality and taste, the relationship that a craft cider brand can create between its product and its consumers is going to make a difference and build strong brand loyalty that will keep them coming back, similar to what has worked for craft beer packaging design. Will, then, brand loyalty shift to the smaller, lesser known, craft cider with a story?

August 03, 2016  |  BY Design Womb

Food Truck Feature: Boo Coo Roux | Chicago, IL

Boo Coo Roux Food Truck Wrap Design and Branding, Chicago Illinois

We had the opportunity to sit down with Marissa and Matt of Boo Coo Roux, a Cajun & Creole food truck based in Chicago, and learn about their journey. 

How did you decide to go forward with launching your own food truck?

We thought about it for a while and imagined some different scenarios, some in where we would possibly leave Chicago. There was about two years of various research, trips to other cities, getting to know the scene around Chicago, and experimenting with recipes before we decided it was time to go for it. We realized the the food truck scene was growing in Chicago and wanted to jump in before it became oversaturated.

What inspired the branding, logo design, and identity look & feel for your food truck?

We wanted something fun and kind of crazy without going too overboard or looking like a scene from Bourbon Street. In our heads we imagined a clean and sophisticated look that had an edge to it. We initially wanted the design to be colorful without looking tacky. We never imagined black as being our background color or main color, but when we were presented with it we loved it. Nicole transformed our ideas exactly how we imagined it. 

How did you pick the name for your truck?

We originally thought of the name Roux, simple yet an important ingredient in one of our main dishes, gumbo. That name was taken, not by another truck but by another Illinois business so we started playing around with how we could still use the word roux in our name. We researched words and found the slang word "boo coo" which comes from the French word "beaucoup" meaning "a lot" and it all came together from there.

What kind of truck does your food sell in 10 words or less?

Homemade fresh and spicy quality Cajun comfort food with a twist.      

Any quick, insightful or funny story as to how you decided to really go forward with launching your own food truck?

We originally considered moving to Colorado in order to open a Chicago-style food truck with dishes like homemade Italian beef and homemade hot dogs and bratwursts. After some research on the industry in Colorado we decided to stay in Chicago and try it here first. We needed to drop the Chicago-style food since there are already so many options (but we still have an amazing Italian beef recipe on the back burner just in case!). From there we thought about the type of food that was lacking in restaurants and especially the food truck scene and we landed on Cajun. Matt and Louis have strong backgrounds in French cooking as well so it really made sense since so many of Cajun dishes incorporate French cooking techniques. 

How do you use your food truck's website for new business and what features do you think are the most important online?

We use the website to advertise our menu as well as catering options. I think the most important feature is keeping an updated menu. Most people want to know what is available if they are going to make the trip to the truck. We don't use the website yet to post our schedule but hope to in the future. Without going into detail, the food truck parking scene is no joke and there are days where it can be hard to know where one will park. We post our locations for lunch both on Facebook and Twitter.

What's been the hardest thing to date in the whole process of launching your food truck?

Everything. It's an emotional experience when you own your own business, you become invested in every aspect. However, if I have to pick one area that was the most difficult it was probably the initial startup and build of the truck. It seemed like it would never end despite being organized and doing everything in our power to move things along.

What's been the most surprising (success or tip)?

We are not from Louisiana so we were very cautious to pursue this style of cuisine and wanted respect the food while making it our own. This involved a lot of R&D and some trips to New Orleans. That being said, it's an overwhelming success when someone from the region compliments our food. We always create food that we hope pleases the masses but a compliment from a native is always the icing on the cake.

What is/are some of the most helpful resources you found in researching how to launch a food truck?

Matt knows the owner of the Fat Shallot from his days at Everest and he was lucky enough to work on the truck. He got to see first-hand what operation on a truck was like. His experience gave him a good foundation of where to begin the process and what to think about. They were and still are a helpful resource.  There are so many details to think about with startup like insurance, propane, vendors, food cost, website, design, etc.

Words of wisdom do you want to leave us and any fellow aspiring food truckers across the country with?

It's tough. Any cook or chef in the food industry already understands the demands of that world, and a truck is no exception, especially when you approach it with the intention to create everything from scratch like we do. 

What's your personal favorite thing on the menu?

The gumbo! We went through many batches and minor changes to come up with a recipe that we feel best represents the dish.

Favorite part about working with Design Womb on the food truck branding?

Nicole! Throughout the entire startup process she was one of the best people that we worked with. She never missed a beat. We are still obsessed with the final design and could not be happier. I don’t even think we had to make any changes on the design option that we picked because it was so spot on, in fact we had a hard time picking from the options that she gave us because they all were so great!

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June 21, 2016  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Dipnotics Dips Packaging Design

Graphic Design USA featured our custom wrap-around packaging design for Dipnotics Dips. These dips don't taste healthy, they taste delicious. Check out the full project on our site. 

April 28, 2016  |  BY Design Womb

Insights from a Food Lawyer: 5 Important Things to Know About Food Labeling Law

Insights from a Food Lawyer: 5 Important Things to Know About Food Labeling Law

We know starting a food business and working on your food packaging design is hard enough as it is. Throw in the added worry about making sure your labels and packaging design are in line with any required regulations, and many food startups are asking for a headache. We've asked our extended Design Womb team member and legal expert, Lauren Handel, who just launched her own firm, to share some helpful insight on what to consider while working on your packaging design and brand's launch. 

1. Who regulates food labels in the US?

At the federal government level, food labels are regulated by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) (for meat, poultry and processed egg products), the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) (for alcoholic beverages) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (for all other foods). The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has jurisdiction over advertising, including websites and social media marketing. States also have authority to regulate food labels and marketing.

2. Can you be sued for your food label?

YES! In the last few years, the plaintiffs’ bar has played an increasing role in “regulation” of food labels by bringing hundreds of class action lawsuits against food companies allegedly for deceiving consumers with false or misleading food labels. Foods labeled as “natural” that contain genetically modified, synthetic, or highly-processed ingredients have been the primary target of such lawsuits to date. But the litigation has expanded to other types of allegedly false or misleading food labeling—such as labels using the term “evaporated cane juice” to describe a type of sugar ingredient, labeling claims about antioxidants and “superfood” ingredients, and claims about certain products being healthy or good for you when they contain lots of sugar or fat. Competitors also can sue for unfair competition based on a false or misleading food label.

3. What label claims may be made about health-related benefits of a food product?

It is flatly illegal to claim that a food product can help to treat, cure or mitigate any disease. Such claims may be made only for drugs, which must go through extensive review and approval by FDA before they may be sold. However, it is permissible to claim that a food product helps to support a normal, healthy bodily structure or function (such, as “supports a healthy immune system” or “builds strong bones”) provided that the manufacturer has sufficient scientific evidence to back up the claim.
FDA rules also set conditions for using the terms “healthy,” “health,” and other variants of those words, when used in connection with a claim about the nutrients or ingredients in the food. It is illegal to use those terms if the product contains too much fat, cholesterol or sodium, or if does not contain enough of at least one beneficial nutrient (vitamins A, C, calcium, iron, protein, or fiber).

4. What claims may be made about the nutrition content of food?

FDA regulations govern claims characterizing the level of a nutrient in a food product—for example, “high fiber” or “low fat.” Manufacturers may use only certain terminology in making such claims—such as, “good source,” “high,” and “excellent source.” You may not say that a product is “packed with vitamin C,” for instance. FDA regulations also define how much of each “bad” nutrient is too much for a “low” claim and what minimum amounts of “good” nutrients are needed for a “good source” or “high” claim. In some cases, a manufacturer may make a nutrient content claim only if it also includes an additional disclosure.

5. Can you say things on your website that you cannot say on the product label?

In general, no. If the company’s web address is printed on the package label, FDA considers a website to be part of the product labeling and subject to the same rules as apply to the package label. Other kinds of marketing materials—such as product brochures and sell sheets—also can be considered part of the labeling. FDA also looks at websites (and, potentially, social media) for evidence that a company intends to market a food product as an unapproved drug. And, as mentioned above, the FTC also has jurisdiction over websites and social media. The bottom line is: be careful about claims you make anywhere you market your products.

Bio: Lauren Handel is the principal attorney of Handel Food Law LLC, which exclusively serves farming, food, and alcoholic beverage businesses. Lauren’s practice focuses on regulatory compliance and enforcement matters, commercial contracts, and intellectual property.

February 25, 2016  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Green Girl Bakeshop Packaging Design

The Dieline featured our packaging design work for Green Girl Bakeshop's dairy and gluten free ice cream pints and ice cream sandwiches today. You can see the full project on our site. 

February 25, 2016  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Beachy Cream Ice Cream Packaging

Beachy Cream Ice Cream Packaging Pints Pinup Girl Los Angeles California Organic Ice Cream

Thrilled to share The Dieline's feature of our packaging design work for the Beachy Cream ice cream pints today. You can see the full project on our site. 

February 17, 2016  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Brains of the Buyer online course for better food packaging design

Allison Ball, our food industry consultant, is launching an exciting new online course in February called

Food Industry Consultant

While we love to help you launch your food packaging projects, we also love to share exciting news about things that our team and extended family members are up to. Allison Ball, our food industry consultant, is launching an exciting new online course in February called "Brains of the Buyer." This course is for Producers of Good Food, and for the inaugural session, the Design Womb community will receive a generous discount of 30% off.

Food Industry Business – Start Early

"Brains of the Buyer" helps producers grow their food business, thoughtfully. Alli works with you to create a 1 page business plan to clarify what you're actually selling & who you're selling to, why your product is different, and who your competitors are. Together, you then move on to understanding the thought process of wholesale buyers: why they choose particular products to carry and why they pass on others; how they price them; the strategy behind re-ordering, merchandising, and marketing them; and how to convince those retail accounts to say "Yes!" to carrying your products.

Alli currently helps producers increase their wholesale presence through her one-on-one consulting, and is offering group work for the first time this winter. Prior to launching her consulting business, Alli was Head of Grocery & Store Manager at Bi-Rite Market in San Francisco, one of the nation's most influential specialty food markets, where she discovered, supported and promoted hundreds of small food businesses and thousands of retail products.

Online Course – Design Womb Discount

To sign up or learn more, follow this link and use promo code FOODFRIEND to save 30% off the inaugural course. Please note spots are limited, and registrations closes Friday, January 29th at Midnight, PST. Still have questions? Email allison@alliball.com.

January 22, 2016  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Food Truck Website Design Templates

Made For Food Trucks Website Design Templates by Madestack

Made For Food Trucks Website Design Templates by Madestack

Meet Our Side Project

Welcome to Made For Food Trucks by Madestack. We are thrilled to share our labor of love with you. Madestack was born when we came together on client work and saw a huge gap in the market between mediocre website design templates that the average startup person doesn’t know how to install/use and quick web design services that give too much control, aren’t industry specific enough, and might not look very custom.

 

Foot Traffic – Online

Facebook isn’t enough. Your customers are online, on their phones, and reading their tablets. When a friend mentions a delicious tamale or sandwich they tried from a new local food truck, it’s extremely likely that they are immediately looking for you on google to find out where you will be or to check out your menu.

 

Beautiful Design Templates

Our experience in the food truck industry includes the launch of 10 trucks (and counting!) in the branding, truck design, and web design spaces across the globe. The problem? Like many startups in the food and restaurant space, food truck startups and owners don’t have thousands of dollars to throw into a custom website before they launch and generate revenue. They usually spend most of their investment on buying the truck, building the truck’s kitchen and finally branding and wrapping the truck with something visually striking.

We started with something simple. A low-cost subscription template solution that you can use to get your website up quickly without the overhead upfront of paying for a full blown custom website design for your food truck. With our website design templates, you can update information yourself, place photography, and swap to colors that are in line with your food truck’s branding. We’ve designed with the intent that the site has a flexibility and a beautiful end product with a custom look and feel.

We’ll be adding to Madestack and Made For Food Trucks now that we’ve officially launched. Stay on top of news about our future font sets* and features by joining our mailing list.

*coming very soon

August 31, 2015  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Client News: Chicago Restaurant Branding

Chefs John Shields & Karen Urie Shields Chicago Restaurant Branding & Design – West Loop

Chefs John Shields & Karen Urie Shields Chicago Restaurant Branding & Design – West Loop

We're very excited to announce Design Womb's resturant branding and design collaboration in the works this year with chefs John Shields and his wife, Karen Urie Shields. We'll be working alongside the duo for the launch of their highly anticipated Ada St. location, which is split between two floors, and the chefs envision opening two restaurants.

John worked at Charlie Trotter's, and was part of the opening team at the hot Chicago restaurant spot, Alinea. Karen spent two years at Tru working under Gale Gand, then six years at Trotter's, the last three as head pastry chef. As a husband-wife team, they opened Town House in 2008 in the tiny town of Chilhowie, VA, where they quickly acquired a monster reputation; John was a 2011 James Beard semifinalist for Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic.

Check out their Chicago Tribune feature.

July 29, 2015  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Whiskey Packaging Design: What’s Next?

Bullarook Whiskey Design & Label

Koval Chicago Whiskey Package Design Bottle & Label

Number the Stars Whiskey Package Design & Label

Kyro Rye Whiskey Package Design & Label

Moira Dolina Whiskey Package Design Bottle

In 2013 something outstanding happened to me: I discovered that I love whiskey. Having lived out on the West Coast for over 8 years, I was barely drinking anything other than cold-pressed green juice. After an evening of oysters and drinks on a snowy Chicago night, everything changed. I found my drink: The Manhattan cocktail. The crispness of a great small-batch whiskey mixed with the sweetness of vermouth, all tied together with some craft aromatic bitters and that boozy cherry had me on the first sip. On the rocks, please.

This is all to say: women like whiskey too.

 

Where Is Whiskey Packaging Design Now?

Working in the food and beverage packaging and design space, I am always observing what products I purchase and what products I pass by. While whiskey packaging design is indeed starting to expand in aesthetic with a lot of modern, clean, and novel approaches, overall the designs are overtly masculine or “Old World” feeling. I want what's inside the bottle, of course, but there's very little on what's outside the bottle to sway my purchasing decision.

New craft distilleries are popping up across the country, definitely an exciting proposition, and with that some updated approaches to whiskey branding. While this is exciting, I think there are a lot of unexplored possibilities that speak to both genders that can successfully market to this new wave of younger whiskey consumers.

 

What's Next For Whiskey Packaging Design?

As it stands now, the whiskey packaging design market may be predominantly a man’s world. But as a whiskey startup distillery, I know I would want to capitalize on the new generation of whiskey drinkers and appreciators. That translates to whiskey packaging design that doesn’t put off female buyers and packaging that explores modern ways to speak to both genders. Obviously the history and lore of the drink lends to the traditional designs in whiskey packaging, but does whiskey have to feel so old and serious all the time? I'm not talking about wrapping the bottle in pink lace -- just give me something more contemporary and appealing.

Like craft coffee, I think these new small batch whiskey brands are slowly starting to explore some different and modern designs and veer away from heavy masculinity, but there is a lot of opportunity in pushing whiskey packaging design further. An amazing and quality product needs unique and quality design to accompany it. If you want to stand out on the shelves and persuade consumers that your brand is better than your competitor's, focusing on creating a novel and distinctive design aesthetic is paramount.

In the end, do you really want your brand to look like everything else on the shelf that your products will live on?

 

Bullarook (Kyle Poff)  Koval (Dando)  Number the Stars (Candu Coated Universe)  Kyro (Werklig)  Moria Delina (Hope Aylen)

July 22, 2015  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Happy National Packaging Design Day-

Jules & Esther Skincare Package Design Design Womb Chicago Illinois  Jules & Esther Louisiana

Ripple Coffee Package Design Bag Design Womb Chicago Illinois  Ripple Coffee Roasters South Carolina

Whistle for Dogs Package Design Device Box Design Womb Chicago Illinois  Whistle San Francisco California Bay Area

Pantry House Design Label & Jars Design Womb Chicago Illinois  Pantry House Goods Santa Cruz California Mustard Jam Butter Jelly

1148 Cosmetics Co. Makeup Beauty Package Design Design Womb Chicago Illinois

Sabor Brasil Package Design Standup Pouch Design Womb Chicago Illinois  Sabor Brasil San Francisco California Bay Area Frozen Brazilian Cheese Rolls

Beachy Cream Organic Ice Cream Sandwich Package Design Flexible Bags Design Womb Chicago Illinois  Beachy Cream Ice Organic Cream Los Angeles California

To celebrate, we're sharing a few of our favorite collaborations from the past year or so. #PackagingDesignDay

May 07, 2015  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Troya Kitchen Food Truck – Progress!

Troya Kitchen Mediterranean Food Truck San Francisco Bay Area Vinyl Wrap Design – Design Womb Chicago, Illinois

Here's a little progress sneak peek at the food truck we designed for Troya Kitchen in San Francisco courtesy of Custom Vehicle Wraps.

May 06, 2015  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Food Truck Designs featured on Print Magazine

Falasophy Food Truck Branding & Truck Design - Falafel & Hummus, Orange County, California – Design Womb, Chicago Illinois Print Magazine

Falasophy Food Truck Branding & Truck Design - Falafel & Hummus, Orange County, California – Design Womb, Chicago Illinois Print Magazine

Curry Up Now Food Truck Branding & Truck Design - Indian Street Food, San Francisco Bay Area, California – Design Womb, Chicago Illinois Print Magazine

Curry Up Now Food Truck Branding & Truck Design - Indian Street Food, San Francsico Bay Area, California – Design Womb, Chicago Illinois Print Magazine

We are very excited and honored to have two of our food truck designs and branding projects featured on Print Magazine this week. Print Magazine chose the Curry Up Now and Falasophy branding and food truck designs as part of their feature on 8 Ingenious Food Truck Designs. Print Magazine is an iconic design and visual culture brand encompassing a venerated magazine, a website, premium book and e-book lines, and the Regional Design Annual, one of the most well-respected design competitions in the industry. 

See the feature here.

April 10, 2015  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Falasophy Food Truck

Falasophy Food Truck Branding and Truck Wrap Design. Orange County, California – Southern California

Sexy and fun falafel, fries, and hummus have been roaming the streets in Orange County, California in the Falasophy food truck. We're thrilled to have been a part of this successful launch. See the full project.

Photography: Michelle Edmunds | Imaging: Core Group Studio

April 03, 2015  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Ripple Coffee Packaging Featured on The Dieline

Ripple Coffee Roasters Whole Bean Brand Identity and Package Design – Flexible Packaging

We're honored to have our package design work for Ripple Coffee Roasters featured on The Dieline.

Ripple Coffee is committed to roasting beans strictly from farms owned by women. The company is dedicated to compensating women for their contributions by giving a percentage of each purchase back to the community.

See it here: http://www.thedieline.com/blog/2014/12/23/ripple-coffee or visit our project overivew.

January 12, 2015  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Pantry House Package Design

Pantry House Santa Cruz California Small Batch Mustard, Jams, Pickles Package Design, Logo Design, Brand Identity

Here's a little taste of some brand identity and packge design work we did for Pantry House over the last year. Isabel's horseradish mustard is a hot commidity. Grab yours on her e-commerce site which we designed and launched.

August 13, 2014  |  BY Nicole LaFave

An Interview: graphicdesign.com

Curry Up Now Indian Food Menu Graphic Design

I am happy to share the interview I did with Julia Wild over at graphicdesign.com last week. The quick interview shares some insight on Design Womb's ongoing collaborations with Curry Up Now, and how we approached their menu design and accounted for customer's specialty diet restrictions, such as gluten-free, vegetarian, and vegan eats. There's also mention of a few of the current projects we're working hard on this summer, if you want a sneak peek.

July 02, 2013  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Food Truck Design | Part 2

Brand Identity, Graphic Design and Food Truck Design. Truck Wrap and Decals. Chicago, Illinois

How does the food truck design process work? Paint or wrap? Raw or finished? Decals or hand-painted with custom signs or add-ons? This stuff takes time. Always more than you think.

As a new business, you acquire a food truck. You buy it new or used, have a truck modified or (gasp!), spend the big bucks and custom build a beauty. Before this step or while you are shopping, you have reached out to a branding team, such as Design Womb, to begin working on the name, logo design and branding collateral. The minute you knew what you were serving, you started. Every week counts leading into the big food truck debut.

When a client calls me with a food truck concept, we discuss the big list wish items, we create a proposal, prioritize the items and than immediately dive in. This list should include not only the truck design itself, but your menus, the food packing, website, uniforms and all the other branded collateral and swag. It is helpful to have your wish list with some realistic dates in mind when you contact Design Womb. Prepare to be asked a lot of questions. If your designer doesn't ask you questions and they can do all of this on a penny, find a new one. You'll end up spending twice as much having to start over if it isn't right from the beginning.

At this point, Design Womb continues to assist in the process. We can help find or source the right team to paint, wrap or decal the vehicle. We walk through a careful food truck design process which involves planning and templates that act as a blueprint for your truck. If you are printing and wrapping the truck, any good printer should be able to provide you with a template file to scale. This is very important. The goal is to leave nothing up for interpretation so there is very little wiggle room for change from design file to actual truck execution.

When your design is approved, Design Womb will assist in the material selections and color planning. We pre-press and set the files based on your client-approved paint, Pantone and color selections. Once these final art files make it to the truck wrapper, printer or painter, you might have a final vehicle within a matter of days, sometimes a week or two. Here is where I push every one of my clients to be sure to have a photo shoot of some sort planned. You're going to want those beauty shots of your brand new truck for press and marketing. Drawing on first-hand experience, its a lot easier for you to do this before your truck hits the streets. Once you get super busy, it is hard to justify shutting down for a few hours and becomes hard to capture some decent off hours to take photographs, or (dare I say it) your truck starts to get dirty or dinged up. This is also prime time to keep pushing forward with your other brand collateral and your website. Your website should update customers on truck locations, menu changes and events. That's a whole different blog post for another day.

April 29, 2013  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Food Truck Design | Part 1

Beachy Cream Organic Ice Cream Cart & Branding

Curry Up Now Food Truck Design & Branding

The Dosa Republic Food Truck Design & Restaurant Branding

The moment a digital friend referred to me (jokingly) as The Food Truck Girl, I knew I had a situation. It all started back in 2010. My first was the Curry Up Now truck, which expanded into a small army of branded trucks in the Bay Area.

Shortly after in 2012, Curry Up Now's sexy sister The Dosa Republic launched with a brick & mortar and a food truck. Ok. Rewind. Technically, it started in 2009. Beachy Cream launched and they hit the streets of Los Angeles with a mobile ice cream cart and umbrella. Ice cream on wheels counts, right? Ice cream sandwiches & a heck of a lot of Indian food later, in 2012, Sajj launched its quick-serve falafel & shawarma concept and food truck.

Johnny Doughnuts took center stage with its retro deco in the fall of 2012. Mmmmmm, gourmet doughnuts and hot coffee. The truck is ready to roam and will launch this month. Bay Area folks, get ready. These guys aren't messing around and are a heck of a lot of fun.

The first half of 2013 packs a bold punch. Design Womb will collaborate on the branding and debut for the Drums & Crumbs food truck in Sonoma County (southern food, California spin) as well as KAMA Food Lab, a vegetarian (to start) customer-focused ethnic concept to hit the streets of San Francisco this summer/fall.

April 18, 2013  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Pantry House | Handcrafted Provisions

Santa Cruz's Isabel Freed is launching Pantry House; a line of handcrafted jams, mustards, butters & sauces. Be on the lookout for the collaboration Design Womb did on the new branding, package design & website (where you'll be able to shop to order online) this spring/summer.

March 28, 2013  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Taste Patrol Olive Oil

Last year I invented a little brand for California olive oil packaging. These were gifted to a handful of clients, friends & family. The full project photos will be featured on the new Design Womb site in early 2013, but in the meantime here is a little snippet reminder of my love of helicopters. I love a good chopper.

November 16, 2012  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Beer & Branding: Big Nut Brewing

October 25, 2012  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Brand Board: Curry Up Now Indian Street Food

October 24, 2012  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Brand Board | Beachy Cream Organic Ice Cream

I always see these cute little brand boards floating around on Pinterest lately. I thought I'd give it a whirl here.

October 23, 2012  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Ice Cream Sandwich Packaging

The Beachy Cream ice cream sandwich packaging sleeves have arrived. Inspired by fun in the sun, beach balls and polka dot bikinis, ice cream just got a whole lot more fun. These are going to make killer favors at parties & weddings. You can see more of the branding project for my client here or visit their site to order ice cream online.

January 17, 2012  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Communication Arts Typography Annual 2

Thank you Communication Arts for selecting Design Womb's Curry Up Now logo & truck for this year's Typography Annual. Winner! On stands now.

January 17, 2012  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Taste Patrol Olive Oil Packaging

My new favorite aisle at the grocery store it the olive oil section. The packaging design lures me in. It's hard to beat the wine area or chocolate bar area, but lately the olive oil market seems to be getting bigger and bigger. I would love to do more of this kind of work. Specialty food packaging = dream design projects to me. I felt pretty inspired to do some packaging design for a holiday gift this year and incorporate something I love looking at, helicopters! The result was California extra virgin olive oil, Taste Patrol Fine Foods & Findings by Design Womb. We'll see where the chopper takes me next. I've mentioned this before. I love all the different shapes and sizes helicopters come in. Hoping to turn this project into a printmaking project in 2012 for helicopter prints. Keep you posted.

December 30, 2011  |  BY Nicole LaFave

It’s a miracle (tart)!

Hail Merry, I love you. I fell in love the minute I tasted the lime tart. I can't have eggs, dairy or wheat these days, so I was so excited when this actually tasted delicious. They have a web shop with other snacks and treats as well. Yipee! Inner queen? Heck yes. Ask my dad. That's a nickname he had for me when I lived at home. This couldn't be any more perfect. I can have my "cake" and eat it too.

October 27, 2011  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Napa Time

Here are a few snapshots from our weekend trip to Napa with T&B (Chicago peeps). It flew by and I loved it. We did a bike ride and a picnic Friday and spent time with other good buddies that happened to be in San Francisco and Napa at the same time. We were spoiled with good company, gorgeous weather and wine tasting. I have a lot to learn, and can not wait to go back to do more biking, but this was a good first step for me. I dream of designing wine packaging and labels and doing branding for a winery someday. It's been on my bucket list for awhile now, alongside branding a coffee company and maybe some chocolate. Or more beverages. Okay, fine. The list goes on & on.

October 24, 2011  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Food & Beverage Logos

I added a food & beverage logo gallery to Design Womb this weekend. There is something about working on food or beverage-related projects that I find very rewarding. Maybe it has to do with the fact that I am always hungry, or there is just a lot of potential with the branding and packaging out there. I am hoping to keep up these mini portfolio updates to the current site until my new website redesign project is moving full speed ahead, aiming for the new year. Shame on me. I am a year behind with some of these new work & press updates. Better late than never?

October 03, 2011  |  BY Nicole LaFave

The perfect Coffee Gift: Chemex

Why? Chemex It makes delicious coffee, it's pretty on the counter & it forces you to slow down and "smell the coffee" before your crazy day begins if you learn how to use it the right way. At a glance if you were to watch us make coffee at my house, you'd swear a science experiment was about to take place, but when that cup of coffee (usually Sightglass Coffee) hits your nose and your lips, it's 1,000 times worth the wait. This fall, I'll try to see if I can get J-Pierre to do a special guest post someday about tips for home-brewing, like why you should never ever store your beans in the freezer and what type or grinder you should invest in if you are a coffee lover.

September 13, 2011  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Produce delivered.

Organic fresh produce delivered straight from the farm? Yes please. Today I received my first Farm Fresh To You delivery and can not be more excited. It was magical to find this box early this morning at our house. I went for the Fast Fruit & Vegetable box and my kitchen smells amazing. What goodies did I get you ask? I am about to lay my teeth into some fresh organic melon, peaches, red plums, carrots, broccoli, cucumber, tomatoes/heirloom tomatoes & a few fresh oranges all week long. Moving forward I may lean towards a Valley Box or dare I try a Regular Mix once I test out the waters, but being the fruit fiend that I am, I knew this was a safe pick. Thinking about getting one for yourself? Get yours on their site, but be sure to use my full name as at referral! (I get a free box peeps!)

July 19, 2011  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Sightglass Coffee

San Francisco isn't shy of good coffee, but Sightglass Coffee is definately a favorite. We've been buying coffee beans from them since we moved here last June. You can order beans online & I highly recommend you give it a try if you love coffee. Right now we love our Chemex and if either of us are going it solo we go V60.

July 19, 2011  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Steve’s Craft Ice Cream

June 24, 2011  |  BY Nicole LaFave

BeachyCream.com has launched!

New year, new ice cream. Ann Ryan and I have finalized her brand identity and website. Watch out for updates to my print portfolio with the Beachy Cream full package soon.

January 11, 2010  |  BY Nicole LaFave

In the News: Beachy Cream Identity

October has brought some very interesting projects with it, including the Beachy Cream (Malibu's Natural Ice Cream) Identity & Logo Design. Who doesn't agree that Ice Cream is always fun? Beachy Cream's own Ann & I are hard at work on her logo, more to come later!

October 25, 2009  |  BY Nicole LaFave

Branding & Packaging Design